Week 20: The Official Transition of Summer

 Happy farmers, healthy food! (Photo by Claire Burnett)

Happy farmers, healthy food! (Photo by Claire Burnett)

Good Morning Folks,
 
The autumnal equinox is upon us, the time that not just marks the official transition of summer to fall, but also reminds us that the days are more or less the same length as the nights. The last of the summer fruit ripens, tempting one to enjoy them while they still hold the sweet flavors of the warm sun. They make way for cooler crops both in taste and stamina and so we encourage you to get them while they last. The average first frost date for our region has come and gone and because our farm is located in a depression down in the Poudre River Valley, we are often 7 degrees colder than town. You never know when Native Hill will meta-morph into Ol' Frosty Pocket...perhaps that is what we should call the winter share.   But I digress. Coming back to our late summer soree, here on the farm we are continuing our fall harvest efforts, prepping our high tunnels for deep winter planting, sowing fall cover crops, and trading light button downs for flannels and hoodies. 
 
In tribute to the equinox, we ate the first of the winter squash last night.  It was a simple affair, but worth noting.  What an amazing bundle of flavor and versatility the winter squash is.  Its versatility might only rival that of bacon as one can eat it savory or sweet, soup or salad, pizza or frittata; However, unlike America's favorite breakfast meat, it matures in a ready to store form that allows it to wait patiently until we are ready to consume it.  Nature can be so brilliant.  

 From the Market: Bulk heirlooms for your canning pleasure. (Photo by Claire Burnett)

From the Market: Bulk heirlooms for your canning pleasure. (Photo by Claire Burnett)

This week at the market we will have a variety of winter squash, namely delecata, acorn, and a little bit of kabocha. Unremarkable at first glance, the shape and texture of the delecata squash is quite deceptive. But like many things in life, looks can be deceiving. The skin on this squash is quite edible, so cut the squash into rings, roast with olive oil and salt at 400 until ewy-goowy, drizzle with balsamic if you like and prepare to fall in love. Combine your winter squash with baby bok choy for lovely Asian soup or serve the choy as a side sautéed with cherry tomatoes or some sort of summer fruit. Leeks are the last allium that we pull out of the field.  Oddly different from an onion, they can be served alone or with friends. Many folks use them with potatoes for soup on a cold night, but I prefer them sautéed with arugula and some delicious vinegar. Served raw in a salad or wrap, they add a zip that is hard to describe but will leave you wanting more.  Stuff your acorn squash with good pork sausage, apples, leeks and herbs, fatten up for winter.

See ya soon!

Katie
 


This Week's Harvest

VEGGIES:
Kale
Collards
Chard
Arugula
Spinach
Head Lettuce
Hakurei Turnips
Radishes
Broccoli Raab
Baby Bok Choy
Beets
Carrots
Green Beans
Tomatoes
Eggplant
Peppers
Potatoes
Leeks
Yellow Onions
Winter Squash
Garlic
Cabbage (many types!)