Middle of the Lake

 Photo by Claire Burnett

Photo by Claire Burnett

Believe it or not, we have made it to the middle of the lake! Or at least that is what we call it on the farm, the mid-point of the CSA season in which the distance from the shore starts to get closer.  It tends to sneak up on me every year and this year was no exception.  The middle of the lake is not a time to slow down or ease up but instead a time to put your head down, dig deep and keep swimming.  Although we are still planting every week for another month or so, we are also spending more and more time harvesting the fruits of the spring labor.  Although we celebrate food year round on our farm (more on that later), the middle of the lake tends to begin the celebration a bit more in earnest. The choices at the stand become overwhelming and eating Al Fresco gets easier and easier.  Here in Colorado, the celebration is short, usually only 2 months long, and this year, the season will be shorter than usual as we wait for other later season fruits to become abundant.  

The onions are starting to fall over!  And that means we are getting ready for a big harvest and curing session.  We start with the sweet onions and this week we will have walla wallas and candy reds for your dining pleasure.  Hello onion rings!  Alice waters likes to use a yogurt base for here onion rings as she likes the consistancy and tang.  You can thin it out with a little bit of water to get the correct texture for whatever your frying need might be.  

 Photo by Claire Burnett

Photo by Claire Burnett

Cherry tomatoes are starting to come on stronger each week.  The sun gold is our first cherry tomato of the season and many folks ask why we even grow any other colors or varieties as these little guys are like candy.  Feel free to just snack on these guys for the first few weeks but experiment as the season roles on as they are lovely roasted, added to fall risotto, or in hearty green salads.  

Pickling cumbers are in at the farm in abundance!  Please email me if you would like to get on the order list.  I anticipate having them for 3-4 more week, but they could run longer.  In bulk they run $1.75 per lb and although I dream of the year that I will get the dill coordinated with the pickling cucumbers, I believe other growers around town will have dill this week at the market.  If you pick up some green garlic at the stand, you will have a most of the pickling package!

Other notes:  Due to the birth of our son last week, I have not been able to update accounts for this Wednesday.  I will try to get to it today and send out the link soon.  Thanks for giving the family farm a little breathing room on that end.  Also, it is time to start thinking about winter CSA shares!  I'm hoping to have the online store up and running by next week, but we will have applications at the markets for those of you who want to spare the electronic fees.  Winter shares are an awesome way to keep eating seasonally year round with a lovely mix of greens, roots, winter squash, and other little surprises.  Pick-ups are every other Wednesday at Equinox Brewing and it is a great excuse to get out of hibernation to pick up your share and enjoy a pint of delicious beer with friends.  Shares are one size and run $500.  Too much food?  Find a friend and split! We usually sell out, so don't delay too long!

Last note, one of your fellow CSA members, Susan McGrew has some grass fed beef for sale!  She is down to one last animal and wanted me to see if any of you all would be interested.  I believe she sells by the quarter animal.  If you would like more info, please email her at mcgrewss@yahoo.com. 


This Week's Harvest:

Kale
Collards
Chard
Beets
Carrots
Cucumbers
Lemon Cucumbers
Pickling Cucumbers
Zucchini, Yellow Squash, Patty Pans
Green Beans
Cherry Tomatoes
Sweet Onions
Head lettuce 
Basil
New Potatoes


Storage:

 Photos by Claire Burnett

Photos by Claire Burnett

As the tomatoes start to come in, remember that they are a delicate and highly perishable product.  Our tomatoes are bread for flavor rather than durability and are sold ripe and ready to eat.  Tomatoes do not like to be refrigerated.  It changes their texture and makes them a bit mealy.  We just leave ours on the counter in a shady spot and are sure to consume them within 2-3 days of bringing them home.  If you know you will not be able to get to them, the next best thing is the fridge...but know you have been warned!